Home 

Auction $ 
Sy - Index
Grif - Index
A - Z Index
Scrapbook 
Animations 
Slide Show 
Feedback 
 YouTube \
Puzzles
Foundry 
Search 
Links 

 Join    

 Adv    
What's New 
Web Notes 
 
MBCA
Members
Web
 
A-Z Index  
Date Index 
Conventions 
Scrapbooks   
European Tin 
Videos 
Notes  
 

 

UNITED STATES INVESTOR, June 1941, Pg. 24 (1182)

Exhibits Toy Banks
Litchfield Savings Society
Has Some 75 In Its Collection

        The Litchfield Savings Society of Litchfield, Connecticut, drew a considerable number of visitors to its banking rooms recently to see an exhibit of some 75 mechanical toy banks such as were so popular a generation or two ago. The collection is owned by William F. Ferguson, treasurer of the Bank for Savings of New York. Some of Mr. Ferguson's collection are rare today.
        Mechanical banks were very popular in the early 1870s and the State of Connecticut appears to have led in the production of these banks. A foundry in Cromwell, Connecticut, made many varieties of mechanical and non-mechanical banks and the popularity of its product is attested by the fact that they figure so prominently in the collections of people now interested in accumulating contrivances of this sort.
        Among the banks in the exhibit at Litchfield was one of a soldier pointing his gun at a target on a tree trunk. By pulling the lever, the soldier's head is moved and he takes aim, after which the coin is actually shot into the tree trunk right through the target. Another attractive bank depicted three colored ball players using a coin for the ball. When the bank is set in action, the coin is thrown, the batter swings his bat and the coin disappears under the chest protector of the catcher. Still another bank, known as the Boss Tweed Bank, depicts a fat little man dressed in coat and vest of loud colors. When the lever is pushed, the coin is dropped into the man's left breast pocket and he nods his head by way of thanks.
        The Litchfield Savings Society was pleased with the attendance at its exhibit and plans presently to have a display of coins and currency for the public to see. It also purposes to have a number of collections of local interest shown thereafter.


 [ Top] [ Back ] Up ] 1941-06 Ferguson ]