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THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE — November 1951, Vol. CLH Number 5, page 64

 

  
MORTON BODFISH, chairman of the board of the First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Chicago, is not only head of the third largest organization of its kind in the country, but also owns more banks than anyone we know piggy banks, that is. He has nearly 500 of 'em, collected from all parts of the world.
  
Oddly enough, both his loan business and his bank collecting began to grow during the period of our greatest financial crisis, the depression of the '30's. At that time, Bodfish was an instructor of economics at Northwestern University and was also giving a series of free talks to the public on how to stretch and save those elusive dollars. A group of moneyed men selected him as the man to head a new loan association, which now has resources of over $100,000,000. Simultaneously, Bodfish began hoarding antique coin banks, both as a hobby and as a symbol of thrift. Today, his collection is on display at the association's headquarters in Chicago and occasionally goes on the road. Until recently, there were coin banks in nearly every home and Bodfish contends that the nation's future hinges on a return to the saving habit, especially among youngsters. His little banks come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Each one has a history and is reminiscent of an event or spirit of a by-gone era.
  
Bodfish is 50 years old and is chairman of the Executive Committee of the United States Savings and Loan League, an organization of more than 4,000 savings associations and banks. Here he is surrounded by a few of his unusual banks.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ARCHIE LIEBERMAN FOR THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE


 

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