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The American Home Magazine, March 1956
MARY E. MONZE
FROM THE COLLECTION OF MR. SAMUEL F. PRYOR
Step Right Up, Folks One Penny for the Show!


 

Burks Terry is delighted when he puts a penny on the nose of Paddy's pig. When lever is pulled, Paddy's eyes roll back, his jaw moves, he sticks out tongue to lick penny from pig's nose!
     Cock the trigger, place a coin on end of gun, and press down William Tell's foot. He will shoot at apple on son's head, knocking the apple into the tower. All for a penny!
     Indian shoots bear gunsight is drawn back and held in shooting position until button is pressed to pull the trigger. Coin placed on barrel of gun is shot into the bear's chest. These banks are from late 19th century.
     Magician stands on a platform before table where coin is placed. When lever is pressed he lowers hat over coin, nods his head, coin disappears.
     Let's play ball: place coin in hand of pitcher and press lever to pitch coin. Batter will miss, and coin will be safely deposited by the catcher.
     To operate jolly circus clown, you place coin in his hand. Hand rises to deposit coin in mouth when lever in back is pressed. His eyes roll at the same time.
Bank Collection (Begins on page 22)
     Bulldog performs three ways. Place coin on his nose, pull down his tail and hold until he swallows coin. When you release tail, dog's head falls backward, jaw opens, and button on end of his hose tilts so coin slides into opened mouth. A mechanical joy, this toy! And, like the rest of these banks, a true collector's item.
     Here's another realistic bank from Mr. Pryor's collection: Dog Trick invites attention and a thrifty gesture. Put a coin in the dog's mouth, and, as spring is released, he'll jump through the hoop and put the coin safely in the barrel. Hoop is held by a circus clown, no less.
     Uncle Sam nods his head as if to say "thank you" when coin placed in his outstretched hand slips into his carpet bag. The origin is not entirely clear. But it definitely is known that they were popular in Europe before foundries in the United States began to make them for sale to families in this land.
     Reflecting the child at play is this "Girl Skipping Rope" bank. It is wound with key, then coin is put in slot. When lever is pressed, girl skips rope, her head and feet in rhythm, and coin falls into bank. Undoubtedly, these banks were designed to foster thrift in children. But they appealed to adults then, too, just as they do today.
THE END




 

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