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Random information from newspapers and documents pertaining to the J. & E. Stevens Co. that is not posted elsewhere on the MBCA web.


1864-1865
ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT
     The subscribers hereto being manufacturers of Hardware, hereby agree to associate for our mutual benefit and adopt the name of the American Hardware Association.
     The annexed classified list of prices and numbers for the goods named shall be the lowest net cash prices at which they shall be sold until the price shall be changed by a major vote of the signers to this instrument.
     All goods shall be sold for cash subject to draft at sight after 30 days from date of shipment of goods. Goods may be delivered in Boston, New York, Phila. and Baltimore, and no where else, where it is the usual route for goods to pass through either of the two first above named cities, they may be delivered in the City through which they pass, but no cartage paid.
     All boxes and barrels shall be charged and a box of the size of 30 inches long 18 inches wide and 14 inches deep, shall be charged at one dollar each and all other boxes in this proportion, but none less than twenty five cents each, barrels shall be charged at thirty cents each.
     New goods of any different design from those classified may be made but not sold at any less price than classified list for equal weights.
     Any article named in the annexed list may be coppered, but shall not be sold less than 10% above price of Jappanned.
     On orders for any of the articles named in list amounting to One hundred dollars or more given at one time for immediate delivery, a discount of 5% may be allowed, but not to be continued except for a new order of One hundred dollars in value.
     No violation of these articles shall be allowed either directly or indirectly, and any departure from the spirit of this agreement by giving any advantage in any way, except in superior quality, shall be deemed a violation.
     Sworn certificates of no violation of this agreement to be furnished by each member and to be deposited with the Secretary monthly, and the sworn certificate of any employee of any member shall be furnished on the demand of any member, and the failure to furnish any sworn certificates on demand shall be deemed positive evidence of violation.
     Any member may cease to be bound to this agreement on giving three months written notice before withdrawal to the Secretary.
     Any article named in the annexed list may be gold bronzed at a price not less than 100 per ct. above the price of Japanned.
     Each party is at liberty to have one warehouse or agency for the sale of their goods in the cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and San Francisco and no where else.
                (SIGNED)
                J. & E. Stevens Co.
                Hart Manfg, Co. by J. T. Hart
                P. & F. Corbin by Chas. Peck, Secty.
                Landers & Erwin Mfg. Co. by L. Woodruff, Secty.
(The annexed list covers an agreement of fixed prices for Wardrobe Hooks, Hat and Coat Hooks, clothes line hooks, Ceiling Hooks, Schoolhouse Hooks, Harness Hooks, Hanging Hooks).


February 26, 1866
This Memorandum of Agreement
     Witnessed that Thomas McNeil has and does hereby agree to and with J. & E. Stevens Co. located and doing business in Cromwell, Middlesex County, Conn. that he will faithfully serve and labor for said company in the capacity of an Apprentice as may be required by them to learn the Art and Trade of a Bench Moulder for the term of One year from and after the date of this agreement upon terms and conditions hereinafter named, ten hours per day being considered a days work.
     That said J. & E. Stevens & Co. shall not be responsible for any of the acts done by said Thomas McNeil as an apprentice, nor be liable to any charges for his personal expenses of any kind.
     The Said J. & E. Stevens & Co. agree to pay to said Thos. McNeil for the services rendered by him, if faithfully performed the sum as per agreement.
     The said J. & E, Stevens & Co. agree to instruct said Thomas McNeil the Art and trade of Bench Moulding.
     If the said Thomas McNeil shall leave the services of said J. & E. Stevens & Co. without their consent before the expiration of the contract, he shall forfeit to said Company one Months wages due him from said Co.
     In witness whereof he has hereunto set his hand and seal, this Twenty sixth day of February 1866 at Cromwell, Conn.
         In the presence of E. C. Phelps     THOMAS MC NEIL   L.S.


The Penny Press, Wednesday, November 24, 1886
Cromwell, Connecticut

     Elisha Stevens, at one time one of the wealthiest residents of this place, died in New Haven, Tuesday morning, after a lingering illness. Deceased was the founder of the J. & E. Stevens Mfg. Co. of this place, and aided several other new enterprises, which were all for the good of the town. He was at one time in prosperous financial condition, but financial distress, coupled with other mishaps, brought on kindred other mishaps, and his remaining days were spent with kind friends out of town. He was a capable business man, and always took an interest in any new enterprise. The residents of this place can look back and say, one of our foremost citizens, in years gone by, has gone to that land from whence no traveler has ever returned. His age was about 70 years. His funeral will take place Friday in this place.


The Penny Press, Thursday, November 25, 1886
Cromwell, Connecticut

     The funeral of Elisha Stevens will take place at the M.E. Church, Cromwell, at 10 A.M. Friday


The Penny Press, Friday, November 26, 1886
Cromwell, Connecticut

     The funeral of the late Elisha Stevens took place this afternoon at two o'clock. Numerous friends and relatives were in attendance.


The Penny Press, Saturday, November 27, 1886
Cromwell, Connecticut

     Work was suspended in J. & E. Stevens factory yesterday on account of the funeral of Elisha Stevens.


1880's
     We the undersigned, manufacturers of Mechanical Toy Banks, desiring to keep the prices of our goods so that all dealers handling the same may be enabled to make a reasonable profit on them, and thus encourage them to push the sales of such goods, do hereby pledge ourselves to sustain the following agreement. All banks heretofore sold by us ranging in price from $5.50 per dozen and upwards, shall be sold at an advance of one dollar per dozen from former prices, with the express understanding and proviso that they are subject to a further rebate or discount of one dollar per dozen, to be paid Jan. 15, 1887, to customers who have purchased banks of us at the advanced prices, and have not sold them either directly or indirectly (themselves or their representatives) at prices lower than at which they were billed to them. Said rebate to be paid on or before Jan. 15, 1887, to all purchasers who will write to the manufacturers in question, and over the signature of a member of the firm or company so purchasing, state that the required sale prices have in no case been undersold by them.
               The J. & E. Stevens Co.
               Shepard Hardware Co.
               A. C. Rex & Co.
     We, the undersigned, hereby pledge ourselves to carry out the provisions of the above agreement.
     We, the undersigned, agree to pay to ............................................ on or before Jan. 15, 1887, the rebate agreed upon, of one dollar per dozen on all banks quoted @ $5.50 per dozen and upwards, and billed @ $6.50 per dozen and upwards, upon receipt of the written assurance of a member of the firm or company that required sale prices have in no case been undersold by them or their representatives.


The Penny Press, Friday, January 8th, 1892
Cromwell, Connecticut

     Deacon John Stevens, who has been sick with pneumonia for the past week died yesterday morning at 11 o'clock. Mr. Stevens was one of the oldest and best known men in town as he had always been in business, until within the last five years at which time he retired. He was the assignator of the J. & E. Stevens Co., which firm is known in all parts of the United States, and a portion of Europe, and was President of the firm at the time of his death. Deceased had been a resident of the town for the last 30 years, and has done much for it during this period. He leaves a wife and four children, two sons and two daughters. The funeral will take place at the Congregational Church, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Deceased was 85 Years and four Months old.


The Penny Press, Saturday, March 22, 1902
Middletown, Connecticut

     A NEW AUTOMOBILE
Tests for speed and hill climbing given the new wagon.
     Russell Frisbie, of Cromwell, has just completed an automobile on which he has been at work at his home in Cromwell for the past three months. The first tests of the new machine were given yesterday and today and it was found to work satisfactorily. The wagon complete weighs 1000 pounds and is built dos-a-dos for the accommodation of four people. The motive power is gasoline. The engine develops from eight to ten horsepower. It is capable of making 1500 revolutions a minute and in the tests pulling the wagon it made 600 revolutions. Mr. Frisbie has incorporated many new ideas in this wagon and it is expected to be very speedy. He anticipated that it will be capable of making 40 miles an hour on ordinary roads and more miles on specially prepared tracks. The tests have included speed and hill climbing and have met the expectations of the builder and owner.


The Penny Press, Saturday, October 11, 1902
Middletown, Connecticut

     MAKING AUTOS
Russell Frisbie of Cromwell busy on large machines
     Russell Frisbie of Cromwell, who has turned out one of the most creditable autos in this part of the state for appearance and general working qualities, is at work on special orders for two large machines of the gasoline type, similar to the machine owned by Mr. Allen of Hartford. Who the machines are for is not known. Mr. Frisbie has a number of machinists at work with him and is pushing the work along as fast as possible. Besides the autos in the work, Mr. Frisbie is working on three motors of his own special construction for the trade.


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